PauksciuPienas

the day after

sevenyellowfields:

The human body has four types of movable joints. Most people don’t really think about them unless they start to become painful. In fact, their motion is really quite beautiful, but that beauty can be hard to appreciate because we usually can’t see how the bones are sliding around relative to one another.

X-rays provide a window inside the body, but they are most often static images that don’t depict movement. However, Cameron Drake of San Francisco has created a collection of magnificent images showing joints in motion. He was aided by orthopedic physician Dr. Noah Weiss and the finished product is completely amazing. If you’d like to know more about the project, please check out Drake’s blog.


Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/amazing-x-ray-gifs-show-joints-motion#kdErucAOzwL4dYwe.99

maihudson:

Trisha Brown, Leaning Duets, performed by Trisha Brown Dance Company, Tate ModernSee more here→

maihudson:

Trisha Brown, Leaning Duets, performed by Trisha Brown Dance Company, Tate Modern

See more here→

shovelmercenary:

I can feel it in my bones

Omo Masalai, Papua New Guinea

photos: Eric Lafforgue, Timothy Allen

maihudson:

Image from Vsevold Meyerhold, Biomechanics Workshop, 1920 The actors acting in his productions employed a particularly physical method developed by Meyerhold himself which is known as Biomechanics.This technique consisted in a series of exercised that helped the actor release emotional potential through movement. Gerald Raugin in his article “Bodies, Things, and Social Machines” descibes biomechanics as follows:
" Contrary to the psychology of the plot and to an empathetic audience, the core components of biomechanics were the rhythm of language and the rhythm of physical movement, postures and gestures arising from these rhythms, coordinating the movement of the body and bodies with one another. The development of the plot was not to come from “within”, from the psyche or mind, but rather “from outside”, through the movement of the body in space. These components were created through an economy of means of expression, control of bodies and gestures, precision and tempo of movement, speed of reaction and improvisation. Meyerhold’s acting school was not merely a school for gymnastics and acrobatics, but rather attempted to bring the actors to calculate and coordinate their movements before that and beyond it, to organize their material, to organize the body.” →

maihudson:

Image from Vsevold Meyerhold, Biomechanics Workshop, 1920

The actors acting in his productions employed a particularly physical method developed by Meyerhold himself which is known as Biomechanics.This technique consisted in a series of exercised that helped the actor release emotional potential through movement. Gerald Raugin in his article “Bodies, Things, and Social Machines” descibes biomechanics as follows:

" Contrary to the psychology of the plot and to an empathetic audience, the core components of biomechanics were the rhythm of language and the rhythm of physical movement, postures and gestures arising from these rhythms, coordinating the movement of the body and bodies with one another. The development of the plot was not to come from “within”, from the psyche or mind, but rather “from outside”, through the movement of the body in space. These components were created through an economy of means of expression, control of bodies and gestures, precision and tempo of movement, speed of reaction and improvisation. Meyerhold’s acting school was not merely a school for gymnastics and acrobatics, but rather attempted to bring the actors to calculate and coordinate their movements before that and beyond it, to organize their material, to organize the body.”

asylum-art:

“Naturally” by Bertil Nilsson

Naked male dancing bodies and natural landscapes are the main elements of Bertil Nilsson’s “Naturally” collection. The Swedish photographer captures on his ongoing collection the forms of strength created by the human body and frames them with stunning landscapes. Moreover, in order to create a sharp contrast he usually “dresses up” the bodies of the dancers with colors.

The now based in London Nilsson collaborates extensively with dancers and circus artists because as he states he draws inspiration from movement and human form.

(Source: f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s)